• WHAT KIND OF HOMEOPATHY TO TAKE FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES

    FIRST THE GOOD NEWS:
    Type 2 Diabetes treatment in homeopathy is possible

    Homeopathy for Type 2 Diabetes will work but slowly over days and months

    Type 2 Diabetes cure in homeopathy is completely possible especially in young subjects.

    Homoeopathic medicine for Type 2 Diabetes will do wonders without side-effects

    Homeopathy given for Type 2 Diabetes will show gradual improvement and not sudden but without side-effects so its more advisable to take homeopathy and not just metformin derivatives. Regular use of anti diabetic medicines may give rise to heart problems and thyroid disorders, especially when taken for more than 1 year.

    Treatment of any kind of Type 2 Diabetes in homeopathy will do wonders for you but in long term especially when a constitutional remedy is selected.

    Type 2 Diabetes homeopathic treatments are easy but only in the hands of an expert. Don’t fall for commercial chains of homeopathic clinics promising you the sky. Always look for homeopaths with MD degree and not just BHMS or LCEH

    Now the NOT so GOOD news:

    There are several forms of Homeopathy practised around the world.

    Polypharmacy: where several remedies or a combination of remedies is given to the patient in repeated doses. The outcome of which is extremely poor.

    Classical homeopathy: where a single dose of a single remedy is given and will give you the best results. But please make sure that your homeopath is not giving you and charging for placebo.

    Symptom specific treatments: where only the symptoms or the effects of autism are treated. This will also give very poor results. This is also called HOMEO-ALLOPATHY. Insulinum or Syzizium Jambolinum will never be able to cure you of Diabetes it’ll only act as and anti-sugar drug like in allopathy.

    Classical homeopathy has been used with some success to alleviate symptoms, both mental and physical, or to cure individuals with Type 2 Diabetes. For many patients who have seen a large overall improvement in their Type 2 Diabetes, homeopathy has played a major role.



    SYMPTOMS
    Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for:

    Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
    Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger.
    Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine.
    Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable.
    Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus.
    Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your ability to heal and resist infections.
    Areas of darkened skin. Some people with type 2 diabetes have patches of dark, velvety skin in the folds and creases of their bodies — usually in the armpits and neck. This condition, called acanthosis nigricans, may be a sign of insulin resistance.
    WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR
    See your doctor if you notice any type 2 diabetes symptoms.

    CAUSES
    Type 2 diabetes develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. Exactly why this happens is unknown, although genetics and environmental factors, such as excess weight and inactivity, seem to be contributing factors.

    HOW INSULIN WORKS
    Insulin is a hormone that comes from the gland situated behind and below the stomach (pancreas).

    The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream.
    The insulin circulates, enabling sugar to enter your cells.
    Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream.
    As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secretion of insulin from your pancreas.
    THE ROLE OF GLUCOSE
    Glucose — a sugar — is a main source of energy for the cells that make up muscles and other tissues.

    Glucose comes from two major sources: food and your liver.
    Sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, where it enters cells with the help of insulin.
    Your liver stores and makes glucose.
    When your glucose levels are low, such as when you haven’t eaten in a while, the liver breaks down stored glycogen into glucose to keep your glucose level within a normal range.
    In type 2 diabetes, this process doesn’t work well. Instead of moving into your cells, sugar builds up in your bloodstream. As blood sugar levels increase, the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas release more insulin, but eventually these cells become impaired and can’t make enough insulin to meet the body’s demands.

    In the much less common type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys the beta cells, leaving the body with little to no insulin.

    RISK FACTORS
    Researchers don’t fully understand why some people develop type 2 diabetes and others don’t. It’s clear, however, that certain factors increase the risk, including:

    Weight. Being overweight is a primary risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The more fatty tissue you have, the more resistant your cells become to insulin. However, you don’t have to be overweight to develop type 2 diabetes.
    Fat distribution. If your body stores fat primarily in your abdomen, your risk of type 2 diabetes is greater than if your body stores fat elsewhere, such as your hips and thighs.
    Inactivity. The less active you are, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up glucose as energy and makes your cells more sensitive to insulin.
    Family history. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases if your parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes.
    Race. Although it’s unclear why, people of certain races — including blacks, Hispanics, American Indians and Asian-Americans — are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than whites are.
    Age. The risk of type 2 diabetes increases as you get older, especially after age 45. That’s probably because people tend to exercise less, lose muscle mass and gain weight as they age. But type 2 diabetes is also increasing dramatically among children, adolescents and younger adults.

    Prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which your blood sugar level is higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Left untreated, prediabetes often progresses to type 2 diabetes.
    Gestational diabetes. If you developed gestational diabetes when you were pregnant, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases. If you gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds (4 kilograms), you’re also at risk of type 2 diabetes.
    Polycystic ovarian syndrome. For women, having polycystic ovarian syndrome — a common condition characterized by irregular menstrual periods, excess hair growth and obesity — increases the risk of diabetes.
    COMPLICATIONS


    For More Details Diabetes Specialist in Mumbai Visit Here.


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